Tag Archives: must-see

If Midsommar Is Anything Like Hereditary, I’m Game

Hereditary is my favorite horror film to date.

If you haven’t seen it, I can’t go into detail as to why. Giving too much away will rob you of the mind-boggling, tension-building experience that’s part of what makes the film so sublime.

Here’s all you need to know: A family mourns the death of their matriarch. Toni Colette plays Annie, the mother, and she is nothing short of spectacular in this role. And lastly, you’ll cruise the first 90 minutes of the film with a steady dread, and then the last 30 minutes will really freak you the fuck out.

Hereditary, film

This isn’t a great film in comparison to other horror flicks. This is a great film, period. Beginning with framing, Aster sets up shots beautifully and in a way that gets you wondering what’s real and what’s not. Then there’s the eerie music and distinct sounds  brought to the forefront of the film to play a significant role. And finally, the cast, all of which are extraordinary, but it’s Toni Colette that will make you want to fake a trip to the bathroom. Fight the urge. Stay put. Hereditary is a beautiful, terrifying work of art.

So you can imagine my excitement when I found out that writer/director Ari Aster had created another could-be (hopefully will be) masterpiece.

Screen Shot 2019-06-29 at 5.41.49 PM

Straight from A24’s website, here’s the premise of Midsommar:

Dani and Christian are a young American couple with a relationship on the brink of falling apart. But after a family tragedy keeps them together, a grieving Dani invites herself to join Christian and his friends on a trip to a once-in-a-lifetime midsummer festival in a remote Swedish village. What begins as a carefree summer holiday in a land of eternal sunlight takes a sinister turn when the insular villagers invite their guests to partake in festivities that render the pastoral paradise increasingly unnerving and viscerally disturbing. From the visionary mind of Ari Aster comes a dread-soaked cinematic fairytale where a world of darkness unfolds in broad daylight.

It’s comforting to see a lot of similarities between Aster’s two films in Midsommar’s trailer alone, including the stunning visuals and ominous music.

You might’ve recognized Florence Pugh. She costarred with Maisie Williams (our beloved Arya in Game of Thrones) in The Falling in 2014. And she recently starred in Stephen Merchant’s comedy Fighting With My Family. She’s proven her talent over and over again, so I’ll be happy to see what she has to deliver in this film.

By the way…
If you too are a Florence Pugh fan, you’ll be happy to know that she’ll be playing Amy March in the remake of Little Women, starring Meryl Streep and due to be released Christmas 2019.

Whether or not Midsommar will be just as good doesn’t really matter actually. After Hereditary, I trust Aster. I believe in him. And I can’t wait to watch his new film.

Midsommar premieres in theaters July 3rd. 

 

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It’s a Disaster Is Really Not

Stumbled upon this indie work of art on Netflix, and I’m ever so glad I did.

It's a Disaster

The darkly humorous shot with which the movie opens immediately sets the tone for what you’re about to experience. Then, it introduces you to a cast of frustrating characters in an array of awkward moments and situations. In the background, the subtle sound of police and rescue vehicle sirens blare, and no one (maybe not even you at first) notices because they’re so engulfed in their “disastrous” lives. And yet, you find yourself loving these characters for the messes that they are.

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Brace Yourselves for Prisoners

Yesterday I caught the midnight showing of Prisoners, starring Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal, and write to you today to urge you to go watch it tonight!

Prisoners(Think Mystic River.)

For two and a half hours you’ll be gripping tightly to your partner or, as I found myself doing, covering your mouth in disbelief as the story carries you through this gloomy Pennsylvania small town covered in snow, rain, and dead autumn leaves where two little girls have gone missing as of Thanksgiving afternoon.

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Wit & Humor, Ammo for A Gun in Each Hand

Last night I attended a screening (hosted by the Miami International Film Festival) of Una pistola en cada mano (A Gun in Each Hand) at the Tower Theater in Little Havana. Spanish director Cesc Gay collaborated with Tomás Aragay and a cast of exceptionally talented actors, including Jordi Mollá (Blow and Bad Boys II), to create a film about eight men in their forties, each handling a personal crisis.

The trailer is what got me.

Dialogue dominates this film. There is no gun, not a shot fired, not a single chase. And yet, I clung to every word, every eyebrow lift, every quirky smile. Each scene plays a new scenario with an exchange of words just as intense as the one before it. The most physical movement you get is a slow car ride; so if you’re into fast-paced action films, this is not for you.

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