If Midsommar Is Anything Like Hereditary, I’m Game

Hereditary is my favorite horror film to date.

If you haven’t seen it, I can’t go into detail as to why. Giving too much away will rob you of the mind-boggling, tension-building experience that’s part of what makes the film so sublime.

Here’s all you need to know: A family mourns the death of their matriarch. Toni Colette plays Annie, the mother, and she is nothing short of spectacular in this role. And lastly, you’ll cruise the first 90 minutes of the film with a steady dread, and then the last 30 minutes will really freak you the fuck out.

Hereditary, film

This isn’t a great film in comparison to other horror flicks. This is a great film, period. Beginning with framing, Aster sets up shots beautifully and in a way that gets you wondering what’s real and what’s not. Then there’s the eerie music and distinct sounds  brought to the forefront of the film to play a significant role. And finally, the cast, all of which are extraordinary, but it’s Toni Colette that will make you want to fake a trip to the bathroom. Fight the urge. Stay put. Hereditary is a beautiful, terrifying work of art.

So you can imagine my excitement when I found out that writer/director Ari Aster had created another could-be (hopefully will be) masterpiece.

Screen Shot 2019-06-29 at 5.41.49 PM

Straight from A24’s website, here’s the premise of Midsommar:

Dani and Christian are a young American couple with a relationship on the brink of falling apart. But after a family tragedy keeps them together, a grieving Dani invites herself to join Christian and his friends on a trip to a once-in-a-lifetime midsummer festival in a remote Swedish village. What begins as a carefree summer holiday in a land of eternal sunlight takes a sinister turn when the insular villagers invite their guests to partake in festivities that render the pastoral paradise increasingly unnerving and viscerally disturbing. From the visionary mind of Ari Aster comes a dread-soaked cinematic fairytale where a world of darkness unfolds in broad daylight.

It’s comforting to see a lot of similarities between Aster’s two films in Midsommar’s trailer alone, including the stunning visuals and ominous music.

You might’ve recognized Florence Pugh. She costarred with Maisie Williams (our beloved Arya in Game of Thrones) in The Falling in 2014. And she recently starred in Stephen Merchant’s comedy Fighting With My Family. She’s proven her talent over and over again, so I’ll be happy to see what she has to deliver in this film.

By the way…
If you too are a Florence Pugh fan, you’ll be happy to know that she’ll be playing Amy March in the remake of Little Women, starring Meryl Streep and due to be released Christmas 2019.

Whether or not Midsommar will be just as good doesn’t really matter actually. After Hereditary, I trust Aster. I believe in him. And I can’t wait to watch his new film.

Midsommar premieres in theaters July 3rd. 

 

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: